BOOK A CONSULTATION

Book a consultation (respond below)

BOOK A CONSULTATION

Name

Email *

Message *

DIRECTORY

Saturday, May 25, 2013

New treatments see blood cancer survival rates up



The formula above is not meant as a math trick.  But it does depict some tricky math for cancer survivors like me.

All that I have to say about this search and this topic is that it is good to be counted among the one in four.  That is, according to this source, one in four NHL (non-Hodgkin's lymphoma) survivors have a chance of surviving for five years.   Count me at 5.8 years since my stem cell transplant and 7 years since the diagnosis of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a potent form of NHL.

Reading this article and seeing this illustration of the three bags of stem cells makes for a personal flashback to the August 2007 SCT procedure at City of Hope.

MYJ ZONE (My Journal)


publisher for
constant web and mobile communication
___
http://altacities.com  The alternate blogs ~ Productions by #ALTALOMAN
When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change
___
Now a member of SCAGA }:{  alt@cities on paper.li 

Friday, May 24, 2013

When the diagnosis is certain, but the path is unclear

MYELOFIBROSIS : Just learned in the last few days that a close friend has been diagnosed with myelofibrosis, a serious bone marrow disorder that disrupts the body's normal production of blood cells. The result is extensive scarring in bone marrow, leading to severe anemia, weakness, fatigue, and often, an enlarged spleen and liver.  The news was shocking to hear and a flashback to the time seven years ago when I was diagnosed with MCL (mantle cell lymphoma).

Given that fact that I did not know about myelofibrosis, nor that the disease is a type of chronic leukemia — a cancer that affects the blood-forming tissues in the body, I am on a web search for facts. Myelofibrosis can occur on its own (primary myelofibrosis) or it can occur as a result of another bone marrow disorder (secondary myelofibrosis), according to the Mayo Clinic.

An 'orphan disease' is one that has not been adopted by the pharmaceutical industry because it provides little financial incentive for the private sector to make and market new medications to treat or prevent it. An orphan disease may be a rare disease (according to US criteria, a disease that affects fewer than 200,000 people) or a common disease that has been ignored (such as tuberculosis, cholera, typhoid, and malaria) because it is far more prevalent in developing countries than in the developed world.




Needless to say, I have now exchanged multiple emails and made phone calls to potential sources of help and treatment for my friend, Randy W., who is about my same age, far too young to face the possible morbidity and the shortened mortality that I faced seven years ago before my August 2007 stem cell transplant from an unrelated donor.

Yes, my friend is in good care with a primary physician who made the diagnosis, but also, he has found that the physician is limited in knowledge about treatment for the disease.  Hence, I made a call on his behalf to City of Hope to arrange for a consultation that will happen shortly.  Lesson #1 :  Never wait for well-meaning medical systems to grant referrals to specialists, if that can be hastened.  By their nature, doctors study subjects literally to death; you just don't want that outcome to prematurely become your own.


If interested in this topic further, you may want to read this deeply clinical blogger on the subject:

Perspectives on Hematology, Health Care, and The Profession of Pharmacy


publisher for
constant web and mobile communication
___
http://altacities.com  The alternate blogs ~ Productions by #ALTALOMAN
When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change
___
Now a member of SCAGA }:{  alt@cities on paper.li 

Thursday, May 23, 2013

Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer }:{ My August 2007 stem cell transplant (SCT) was done with adult cells from an unrelated donor.  While the procedure is fraught with risks, mortality, and morbidity factors for the recipient, an SCT or the BMT (bone marrow) equivalent is virtually harmless to the adult donor.  
 }:{  alt@search  }:{  alt@story   }:{ 

Because I was the recipient of life-saving stem cells 5.8 years ago, I am naturally more than a casual observer of the science.  But everyone who seriously follows this story line and these tweets, realizes that society and medicine at large both face certain ethical questions regarding transplants using embryonic cells.  While the adult cells issue is largely resolved, I am not sure that this "breakthrough" cloning of embryonic cells solves the larger ethical issue, but it does bring the science to an important threshold, thanks to the work of:

Shoukhrat Mitalipov is an associate scientist in the Division of Reproductive & Developmental Sciences of ONPRC, Oregon Stem Cell Center and Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Molecular & Medical Genetics, and co-director of the ART/ESC core at the Center. He earned his Ph.D. degree in Developmental & Stem Cell Biology at the Research Center for Medical Genetics in Moscow, Russia. He came to Utah State University in 1995 to conduct his postdoctoral research in stem cell and developmental biology. Dr. Mitalipov moved to the Oregon center in 1998.
In summary, the research by Dr. Mitalipov deals with totipotent and pluripotent stem cells that are important as a unique research tool that allows investigation of the mechanisms regulating early primate development and differentiation. Human stem cells also provide the far-reaching foundation for the field of regenerative medicine and offer hope for the treatment of a wide range of clinical conditions that can be attributed to the loss or malfunction of specific cell types. Translational research in the clinically relevant nonhuman primate model is highly desirable to evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of cell-based therapies. The basic research conducted in the Mitalipov lab provides new insights into the generation, maintenance and developmental potential of primate totipotent and pluripotent stem cells.


and publisher of alt@cities on paper.li for
constant web and mobile communication
___
http://altacities.com  The alternate blogs ~ Productions by #ALTALOMAN
When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change
___
Now a member of SCAGA

Search This Blog

SUBSCRIBE to This Blog

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Today ▶ Canswerist®

Our most popular hardcover book just got better. Modern Essentials: The Complete Guide to the Therapeutic Use of Essential Oils is amazi...

Privacy Notice

Privacy Notice: The sites and blogs of ALTACITIES conform to these PRIVACY PRACTICES.