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Friday, February 26, 2010

MYJ | Counting what's positive about cancer survival

Just a couple of weeks away from the fourth anniversary of the discovery of my cancer (mantle cell lymphoma), my thoughts, by choice, turn to the positive aspects of survival which, of course, is always goal #1.

This article gives an overview of the typical cancer survivor and much that is stated here is reflected in my life. Most notably: dramatic life changes.

Chief among the changes has been my early retirement which officially begins on March 1, although I am still officially on medical leave while some administrative matters are handled. Turning 62 in June of this year, I had always believed that I would probably stay the course of my profession (fund development for nonprofit hospitals) until some unknown years beyond 65. Cancer changed the timetable for sure.
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SOURCE | http://tiny.cc/altacities678
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SEARCH | http://tiny.cc/altacities335
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clipped from www.curetoday.com

Cancer's Silver Lining

Researchers call the positives of cancer post-traumatic growth, but survivors call them cancer’s gifts. 

Surviving cancer is seldom easy. Treatment can be painful, debilitating, emotionally draining, and financially taxing. And yet, despite it all, a surprising number of cancer survivors report finding a “silver lining” in their cancer experience.

This positive perspective, what researchers call “post-traumatic growth,” affects survivors in a variety of ways. From experiencing a spiritual awakening to becoming aware of inner strength, the silver lining often leads to dramatic life changes.

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Sunday, February 21, 2010

MYJ | Be aware of cardiac signs following, during oncology care

Found on my Facebook wall this morning was this video clip from a cardiologist about the need for patients to monitor their cardiac condition following and during cancer treatment. This is sound advice but not intended to create excessive alarm. Like me, if you are constantly under the care of your primary oncologist (and I will be for the rest of my life), he or she can monitor this situation and refer you to a cardiologist when conditions and signs would indicate the need.
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SOURCE | http://tiny.cc/altacities231
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SEARCH | http://tiny.cc/altacities279
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clipped from www.youtube.com




Watch this video in a new window




Consider Your Heart During Cancer Treatment



There's a spectrum of heart disease that's associated with cancer care, including high blood pressure, weakening of the heart muscle and congestive heart failure, according to Guilherme H. Oliveira, M.D., assistant professor in the Department of Cardiology at M. D. Anderson. "The role of cardiac care in cancer treatment is becoming more important than ever," Oliveira says.

"While newer cancer treatments offer patients a better chance of survival, many also have a direct impact on the cardiac system." For example, Oliveira explains that newer targeted therapies zero in on and destroy the molecules that are essential for the survival of cancer cells. But these are the same molecules that are vital for optimal functioning of heart cells.

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